Pragmatic Guide to Subversion
Pragmatic Guide to Subversion
Author: Mike Mason
Publisher: Pragmatic Bookshelf, 2010
Pages: 150
ISBN: 978-1934356616
Aimed at: Team developers
Rating: 3
Pros: Reference, suitable for beginners to Subversion
Cons: Lacks depth
Reviewed by: Alex Armstrong

A slim, task-based guide to the Subversion source control system.

While Git might be gaining ground as the source control application of choice, a lot of people still use Subversion and a lot make a positive choice to use it. This is a small book packed with instructions on getting using Subversion.



The first part is composed of six tasks that get you started. At this stage it assumes that you have a Subversion server ready to use or that you are using a hosted service, so getting started means using a command line or graphical client. Part II is composed of 16 common tasks - checking out , making changes, committing changes and so on.

From here we have working with a team, using the history, creating a branch and file locking. Part VII is about setting up a server including using a hosted service. It also covers details such as backup and restore. Finally we have a section on advanced topics which deals with working with properties, externals and so on.

In total the book covers 48 tasks and many of them are fairly short - the sort of thing you could discover how to do in a few minutes of searching the documentation. They really only serve to make sure you know what to do next. You also have to know a little about version control to make sense of what the tasks are telling you to do - this isn't a tutorial on the problems of version control.

I'm also not sure it is senseitble to have the section on installing a subversion server so later in the book. It isn't a difficult task and many readers might well want to set up a local server just to try things out. The final warning is that the tasks don't go deep into what can go wrong.

Overall this is a book suitable for the complete beginner who is too lazy to read the documentation or who needs a printed copy. If you know anything about Subversion then it could also act as a reference guide. So the final verdict has to be that this book isn't essential reading, but you might find it useful nevertheless.


Arduino Adventures: Escape from Gemini Station

Author: James Floyd Kelly and Harold Timmis
Publisher: Apress
Pages: 308
ISBN: 978-1430246053
Audience: Young beginners at electronics
Rating: 2
Reviewer: Harry Fairhead

Can you combine a sci fi adventure story with learning to use the Arduino? That's what this book sets out to do.

Introduction to Android Application Development: Android Essentials (4th Edition)

Author: Shane Conder,Lauren Darcey & Joseph Annuzzi Jr.
Publisher: Addison Wesley, 4rd Ed
Pages: 672 
ISBN: 978-0321940261
Audience: Intermediate programmers
Rating: 3
Reviewed by: Harry Fairhead

This is a strange 4th edition in that in its previous edition it had a rather different ti [ ... ]

More Reviews

Last Updated ( Tuesday, 25 October 2011 )

RSS feed of book reviews only
I Programmer Book Reviews
RSS feed of all content
I Programmer Book Reviews
Copyright © 2015 All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL License.