Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution - 25th Anniversary Edition
Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution - 25th Anniversary Edition
Author: Steven Levy
Publisher: O'Reilly, 2010
Pages: 528
ISBN: 978-1449388393
Aimed at: Anyone with interest in computer history
Rating: 5
Pros: A good read
Cons: Update section is short
Reviewed by: Mike James

Levy's original book quickly became a classic. Now republished  25 years later is it still relevant? 

Hackers (heroes of the computer revolution) is deservedly a classic and the older it gets the more it becomes a classic. When I first read it many of the events seemed almost too recent to be the subject of a book, let alone a popular "history" book. Now we have the 25th Aniversary edition and many of the things described seem much further away. As Bill Gates says in the short update to the book -

"... And now I'm old and I have to put up with it. It's weird how old this industry has become. When I was young I met with you (the author), and now I'm old, I meet with you. Jesus!"

While many of the comments in the update section are interesting it is very short and if you have an earlier edition then there isn't much in it that would justify buying the new edition. There is also a big jump between the end of the old material and the new - the Internet happened in the gap.

Banner

What this means is that if you are looking for a history of contemporary goings on in the computer world you will be disappointed. This account starts out with the goings on at MIT and mostly describes phone hacking and electromechanical switches in the first few pages. The mini-computer then enters the scene followed by the homebrew micro computer a little later.

The book is divided into four parts. The first deals with the 50s and 60s and the slow change from mechanical and valve-based devices to transistors. Part Two is about the 70s and the rise of the microcomputer and Basic. Part Three is about the rise of the games console and games machines in the 80s.  The final part is a round out about the idea that hacking is a dead or dying activity.

As claimed in the introduction - this is a classic. It is also a good read. The story is well told and unless you are looking for a more up-to-date account of how we got where we are this should be on your reading list.

I wonder what things will be like when the 50th anniversary edition is issued?


Banner


Java SE8 for Programmers (3e)

Author: Paul J. Deitel & Harvey M. Deitel
Publisher: Prentice Hall, 2011
Pages: 1104
ISBN: 978-0133891386
Print: 0133891380
Kindle: B00JC9I3RC
Audience: Programmers moving to Java; students
Rating: 3.5
Reviewed by: Ian Elliot

The latest edition of the Deitel tome on Java has been updated [ ... ]



MySQL Cookbook, 3rd Ed

Author: Paul DuBois
Publisher: O'Reilly
Pages: 836 
ISBN: 9781449374020
Print:1449374026
Kindle: B00M7EN798
Aimed at: MySQL developers
Rating: 5
Reviewed by: Kay Ewbank 

Is MySQL Cookbook the best book on MySQL? This latest edition certainly keeps up its reputation as the go-to reference.


More Reviews

Last Updated ( Friday, 26 November 2010 )
 
 

   
RSS feed of book reviews only
I Programmer Book Reviews
RSS feed of all content
I Programmer Book Reviews
Copyright © 2017 i-programmer.info. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL License.