Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution - 25th Anniversary Edition
Author: Steven Levy
Publisher: O'Reilly, 2010
Pages: 528
ISBN: 978-1449388393
Aimed at: Anyone with interest in computer history
Rating: 5
Pros: A good read
Cons: Update section is short
Reviewed by: Mike James

Levy's original book quickly became a classic. Now republished  25 years later is it still relevant? 

Hackers (heroes of the computer revolution) is deservedly a classic and the older it gets the more it becomes a classic. When I first read it many of the events seemed almost too recent to be the subject of a book, let alone a popular "history" book. Now we have the 25th Aniversary edition and many of the things described seem much further away. As Bill Gates says in the short update to the book -

"... And now I'm old and I have to put up with it. It's weird how old this industry has become. When I was young I met with you (the author), and now I'm old, I meet with you. Jesus!"

While many of the comments in the update section are interesting it is very short and if you have an earlier edition then there isn't much in it that would justify buying the new edition. There is also a big jump between the end of the old material and the new - the Internet happened in the gap.

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What this means is that if you are looking for a history of contemporary goings on in the computer world you will be disappointed. This account starts out with the goings on at MIT and mostly describes phone hacking and electromechanical switches in the first few pages. The mini-computer then enters the scene followed by the homebrew micro computer a little later.

The book is divided into four parts. The first deals with the 50s and 60s and the slow change from mechanical and valve-based devices to transistors. Part Two is about the 70s and the rise of the microcomputer and Basic. Part Three is about the rise of the games console and games machines in the 80s.  The final part is a round out about the idea that hacking is a dead or dying activity.

As claimed in the introduction - this is a classic. It is also a good read. The story is well told and unless you are looking for a more up-to-date account of how we got where we are this should be on your reading list.

I wonder what things will be like when the 50th anniversary edition is issued?


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WebGL Beginner's Guide

Author: Diego Cantor and Brandon Jones
Publisher: Packt Publishing
Pages: 376
ISBN: 978-1849691727
Audience: Beginners not afraid of the technical stuff
Rating: 5
Reviewer: Mike James

WebGL is growing in importance as a way of getting 3D graphics into web pages. The problem is that 3D is a tough subject [ ... ]



OCaml from the Very Beginning

Author: John Whitington
Publisher: Coherent Press
Pages: 204
ISBN: 978-0957671102
Audience:  OCaml beginners
Rating: 4.5
Reviewer: Mike James

OCaml is an odd language. Especially if you are coming from a background in the Java-like languages. A book that promises to take you from the very beginnin [ ... ]


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Last Updated ( Friday, 26 November 2010 )
 
 

   
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